Luderacy

play and letters

The Illusion of Depth

All fiction tries to create the illusion of depth. Describing a world in great detail takes too long, and long-form exposition is boring. So authors use tricks. Part of the the attraction of the [Lord of the Rings] is, I think, due to the… Continue Reading →

Ruins

I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip,… Continue Reading →

Boom Culture Podcast, Episode 1: Prometheus

I love podcasts, and I regularly listen to several. When my friend Alex moved out of state, I jumped at the chance to start recording our frequent, epic conversations about movies, books, video games, music and other pop cultural masterpieces… Continue Reading →

The Semantic College Website

One of the things I’ve been doing in lieu of blogging over the past year is working at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. I was part of an excellent team (very high “awesome at their job” average, even… Continue Reading →

Systems and theology in The Binding of Isaac

The Binding of Isaac is a retro-styled action game inspired by the Old Testament* story in which God orders Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac as a demonstration of his faith. The game has prompted discussion about the relationship between its… Continue Reading →

How to use social media in higher education

If you want to do smart things with social media in higher education, listen to the advice and look at the examples below. I recently realized that I am a “content strategist”—one day I just looked in the mirror, and… Continue Reading →

What is Educational Technology?

Academic specialties are like clown cars: They look much bigger when you’re on the inside. For those of us who oppose calculus on humanitarian grounds, the entirety of mathematics consists of “stuff with numbers.” I’m sure that my recent jobs… Continue Reading →

Early uses of the phrase “educational technology”

Google Books Ngram Viewer is a data visualization tool that uses the Google Books database to show how often a word or phrase has been used in print sources over the years. There are some bugs—inaccurate years of publication, spotty… Continue Reading →

What ever happened to Boom Culture?

Boom Culture is dead. Long live Luderacy. Boom Culture was my previous blog, which ran from January, 2009 until May, 2012. More people read the site than I expected when I started it as a graduate school project. For this… Continue Reading →

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