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education

Narrative in game-based learning

Over the last two years, I have spent a lot of time reading studies about K-12 and college courses that incorporate elements of game design. Sometimes, these elements are directly adopted into the structure of the course: educators use points… Continue Reading →

Jim Gee talk at the University of Arizona

  James Paul Gee of Arizona State University recently spoke at the University of Arizona, which (as of my graduation this weekend) will soon be my alma mater. The title of the talk is “Embodied Situated Learning and Digital Media,”… Continue Reading →

How games tell stories, part 4: Exploratory narrative and the player-as-author

This is part 4 of an ongoing series on the techniques that game designers employ to tell stories in video games. If you haven’t read part 1, part 2, and part 3, you might want to do that first. II…. Continue Reading →

Research project: plans becoming reality

We’re deep into the implementation process for the game-based educational technology referenced in the previous post, and it’s really exciting to see the plans become reality. Trying to force the course management software into tracking and doing things it was… Continue Reading →

Game attributes and mechanics in education (GAME) draft syllabus

My notes are given as bullet points in Courier font. The document itself is in something sans-serif. Assignments in this course Module assignments 15 Level A 7 Level B (or more for extra credit) 3 Level C (or more for… Continue Reading →

Teaching comparative literature with Bioshock, part 2

This is part 2 of my thoughts about how BioShock could be taught as a text in a college-level comparative literature course (although on reflection, I think it could really work in a general English course as well). Part 1… Continue Reading →

1up.com article about games in education

I was interviewed recently for an article on 1up.com about the use and value of games in higher education. It’s a great article written by Bob Mackey, who knows his stuff. I’m quoted alongside Drs. Len Annetta and James Paul Gee. That was flattering and… Continue Reading →

Teaching comparative literature with Bioshock, part 1

This is part 1 of my thoughts about how BioShock could be taught as a text in a college-level comparative literature course (although on reflection, I think it could really work in a general English course as well). Part 2… Continue Reading →

Four ways to teach with games

Update: You can read the paper that I wrote based on this idea at Currents in Electronic Literacy. I can think of two ways to teach using computer or video games that already exist. I can also think of two… Continue Reading →

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