Luderacy

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new media

Dante’s Inferno, the Epic Poem of the Game

Visceral Games, developers of Dante’s Inferno: The Video Game and Travesty, have released as a marketing tie-in a version of the actual poem. The book is translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and accompanied by sixteen pages of “stunning art,” which… Continue Reading →

Teaching comparative literature with Bioshock, part 1

This is part 1 of my thoughts about how BioShock could be taught as a text in a college-level comparative literature course (although on reflection, I think it could really work in a general English course as well). Part 2… Continue Reading →

Serious game: The Path

This review will contain spoilers, so skip it for now and buy The Path if you’d rather not know what to expect on your first encounter with the game. “Where shall I put my skirt?” “Throw it on the fire; you won’t… Continue Reading →

Four ways to teach with games

Update: You can read the paper that I wrote based on this idea at Currents in Electronic Literacy. I can think of two ways to teach using computer or video games that already exist. I can also think of two… Continue Reading →

Play as Terrorists in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2

This topic is a kettle of worms, but it raises too many interesting questions to leave it alone. Here are the facts, some background and my initial take. Call of Duty is a very popular first-person shooter franchise which recently… Continue Reading →

The Educational Games Database

Update: The Educational Games Database now exists, pretty much exactly as described here. I built it in Drupal initially, but will shortly (2012) be porting it to MediaWiki, which is a much better fit for an open-access, community-created resource. Please join… Continue Reading →

Serious game: Democracy 2

Cliff Harris of Positech Games and Mark Batten of Red Marble Games kindly provided me with a review copy of Democracy 2. My impressions, though very positive, were not influenced by their generosity. When I was eight or nine years… Continue Reading →

Why strategy games are good educational tools

There’s a reason why my recent posts have all been on the theme of games that simulate government. As I continue to study pedagogy and games that promote learning, a number of things are becoming clear to me. In no… Continue Reading →

Serious game: Budget Hero

My last post surveyed what I called “government games.” It’s a fluid genre from the point of view of game mechanics, though common elements can be identified (many drawn from the broader strategy genre, such as button-based user interfaces and… Continue Reading →

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