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teaching

Narrative in game-based learning

Over the last two years, I have spent a lot of time reading studies about K-12 and college courses that incorporate elements of game design. Sometimes, these elements are directly adopted into the structure of the course: educators use points… Continue Reading →

Dante’s Inferno, the Epic Poem of the Game

Visceral Games, developers of Dante’s Inferno: The Video Game and Travesty, have released as a marketing tie-in a version of the actual poem. The book is translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and accompanied by sixteen pages of “stunning art,” which… Continue Reading →

Teaching comparative literature with Bioshock, part 1

This is part 1 of my thoughts about how BioShock could be taught as a text in a college-level comparative literature course (although on reflection, I think it could really work in a general English course as well). Part 2… Continue Reading →

Four ways to teach with games

Update: You can read the paper that I wrote based on this idea at Currents in Electronic Literacy. I can think of two ways to teach using computer or video games that already exist. I can also think of two… Continue Reading →

The Educational Games Database

Update: The Educational Games Database now exists, pretty much exactly as described here. I built it in Drupal initially, but will shortly (2012) be porting it to MediaWiki, which is a much better fit for an open-access, community-created resource. Please join… Continue Reading →

"Action-and-goal-directed preparations for, and simulations of, embodied experience"

In chapter 4 of his excellent Good Video Games + Good Learning, James Paul Gee starts discussing video games as a technology from which we can extrapolate—or at least approximate—some of how the mind works to acquire and retain information. He… Continue Reading →

Serious game: Democracy 2

Cliff Harris of Positech Games and Mark Batten of Red Marble Games kindly provided me with a review copy of Democracy 2. My impressions, though very positive, were not influenced by their generosity. When I was eight or nine years… Continue Reading →

Why strategy games are good educational tools

There’s a reason why my recent posts have all been on the theme of games that simulate government. As I continue to study pedagogy and games that promote learning, a number of things are becoming clear to me. In no… Continue Reading →

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