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video games

1up.com article about games in education

I was interviewed recently for an article on 1up.com about the use and value of games in higher education. It’s a great article written by Bob Mackey, who knows his stuff. I’m quoted alongside Drs. Len Annetta and James Paul Gee. That was flattering and… Continue Reading →

Teaching comparative literature with Bioshock, part 1

This is part 1 of my thoughts about how BioShock could be taught as a text in a college-level comparative literature course (although on reflection, I think it could really work in a general English course as well). Part 2… Continue Reading →

Serious game: The Path

This review will contain spoilers, so skip it for now and buy The Path if you’d rather not know what to expect on your first encounter with the game. “Where shall I put my skirt?” “Throw it on the fire; you won’t… Continue Reading →

Four ways to teach with games

Update: You can read the paper that I wrote based on this idea at Currents in Electronic Literacy. I can think of two ways to teach using computer or video games that already exist. I can also think of two… Continue Reading →

Play as Terrorists in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2

This topic is a kettle of worms, but it raises too many interesting questions to leave it alone. Here are the facts, some background and my initial take. Call of Duty is a very popular first-person shooter franchise which recently… Continue Reading →

Good book, crap game: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Do the Harry Potter video games approach the quality and educational value of the book series? I can’t speak for all of the games, but with regard to the most recent entry the series—Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince on… Continue Reading →

"Action-and-goal-directed preparations for, and simulations of, embodied experience"

In chapter 4 of his excellent Good Video Games + Good Learning, James Paul Gee starts discussing video games as a technology from which we can extrapolate—or at least approximate—some of how the mind works to acquire and retain information. He… Continue Reading →

Serious game: Democracy 2

Cliff Harris of Positech Games and Mark Batten of Red Marble Games kindly provided me with a review copy of Democracy 2. My impressions, though very positive, were not influenced by their generosity. When I was eight or nine years… Continue Reading →

Why strategy games are good educational tools

There’s a reason why my recent posts have all been on the theme of games that simulate government. As I continue to study pedagogy and games that promote learning, a number of things are becoming clear to me. In no… Continue Reading →

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